Tags color: 
 

“The Last Kids on Earth and the Forbidden Fortress” takes place during the end of the world. Everything has been destroyed. At this time the world has monsters and zombies everywhere. The Earth is now run down and taken over by interdimensional living vines. The characters must watch everything they do and everywhere they step. “The Forbidden Fortress” is the newest book published in this series written by Max Brallier and illustrated by Douglas Holgate.

Share this story on Twitter.

 “Wonder” was written and illustrated by R. J. Palacio. It is a realistic fiction book that I think all kids grades 3 and up should read. The book is about a boy named Auggie Pullman who was born with a facial difference. Auggie has been homeschooled his whole life, but finally in the fifth grade he attends a public school named Beecher Prep.

Share this story on Twitter.

On a hot day in the desert, birds and other animals are scurrying around the desert looking for food. When they start to feel tired, they stop to rest in a giant cactus, which is their hotel in the desert.

In the book “Cactus Hotel” written by Brenda Z. Guiberson and illustrated by Megan Lloyd, when a bright red fruit falls off a tall saguaro cactus, it splits apart with 2,000 seeds glistening in the sun as it lays upon the sandy floor.

Share this story on Twitter.

 “Our Hidden Powers: Working Together for a Planet in Balance” is a story where we learn about different forms of renewable energy through the lens of five characters. The characters, Windy, Sunny, Terry, Kai, and Ignis, represent wind, sun, earth, water, and fire. They learn that they work together to make renewable, sustainable energy.

Share this story on Twitter.

I recently received the picture book “Under the Desert Skies: Hiss, Sigh, Squawk!,” by Ana Lewis and Corinne Lewis. This book’s art is very collage like. It looks as if the authors cut out newspaper strips and painted them to look colorful. If you have a sister or brother 2 to 5 years old, then you should buy this book at Amazon or your local bookstore.

Share this story on Twitter.

Worlds of Words is a center on the University of Arizona campus where children can explore global literature. The center is located in the College of Education and its mission is to have children learn more about literacy and the world through books. There is a large collection of about 40,000 books representing many global cultures and in a variety of languages. The center hosts school field trips and tours to help bring global literacy into classrooms.

Share this story on Twitter.

I recently read “Belly Up.” It is about a 12-year-old boy named Teddy Fitzroy who is living in America’s newest theme park, FunJungle (The name of the book series). Soon, Henry Hippo, the park’s mascot, turns up dead, and Teddy suspects somebody murdered him. Was it the owner? The clown? Even the chief of security could’ve done it.

The author of this misleading mystery is Stuart Gibbs. Gibbs is also the author of “Spy School” and “Poached.” “Belly Up” consists of 294 pictureless pages and I enjoyed every single one of them. I recommend this book for ages 10 and up.

Share this story on Twitter.

Do you like the Mo Willems’ book “Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus”? Have you read “The Elephant and Piggie” book series? If so, you should visit the Children’s Museum of Phoenix where there is an exhibit hosted by the Pigeon. There are so many games and activities to enjoy with many of Willems’ books characters.

Share this story on Twitter.

I think “Cat Jokes vs Dog Jokes” by David Lewman is an awesome book because the book can be flipped over, and you can read “Dog Jokes vs Cat Jokes.” On one side dogs tell jokes about cats. On the other side cats tell jokes about dogs. Also, the book is about dogs and cats, two of my favorite animals. Plus, it’s a joke book and I’m

into comedy. It’s a comic book and I love making and reading comics. I also like that there are cute characters telling funny jokes to each other. This book has 128 pages and is recommended for ages 7–11.

Share this story on Twitter.

Have you ever heard of ecological restoration? If you haven’t, you should check out “A Kids Guide to Ecological Restoration.”  It is a book with information about the environment’s changes, natural and unnatural. It is written by Dr. Elise Gornish and illustrated by Daniella Cafaggi.

Share this story on Twitter.

Pages