Imagine making a difference someday by casting your vote today. Kids Voting started in 1988 as a way to create voting habits. Susan Nusall, director of volunteers and state coordinator for Kids Voting, says the program teaches kids how to vote, ballot issues and why it is important to vote. Nusall says the goal is to teach the process and increase voter turnout.

Joannie Collins, chief administrative officer for Kids Voting, says it’s important for kids to vote because they need to know they have a voice and use it.

Dr. Hank Hurrass visited Ridgeline Academy to teach summer school students about the Hellcat coil that just became a part of the Guinness Book of World Records. We learned that it took him a year to build the Hellcat coil, and he didn't know whether it would even work. The coil is not a new invention, in fact, it has been around for over a century, one of the many novel creations of inventor and electrical engineer Nikola Tesla, who also developed radio and radar waves, fluorescent lights and the AC distribution system used in our homes today. 

Some of you might not know who Alex Naddour is, but our troop from Queen Creek does. Naddour lives in Queen Creek just like us.

     We were in the middle of earning our "Staying Fit" badge when we heard that Naddour was going to be at the Queen Creek Library before he left for the Olympic Games in Rio. We followed him through the Olympics. He just happened to win a bronze medal on the pommel horse!

Do you remember your first day of kindergarten? Was it exciting, or were you nervous or anxious? Did you or your mother cry? Hopefully it was a great experience for you!

Friedrich Froebel started the first kindergarten in 1837 in Germany. It was very popular, beginning with a half day and soon becoming a full day, teaching children academics, and social interaction in a fun and educational manner.

Heather Morgan teaches kindergarten at Arizona Desert Elementary in Tolleson. Morgan likes working with kids and loves it when they begin to learn and understand.

The sight was majestic. It almost didn’t look real! It is the Grand Canyon!

Starting off its life as a flat-layered rock, the impact the Colorado River had on our great landmark is remarkable and unexplainable. The Colorado River cut 277 miles of beautiful canyon! It started its process millions of years ago, and it’s still going on today.

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