Golfland Sunsplash by Golfland Entertainment Centers (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Sunsplash is a water park that is fun for all ages. There are crazy, insane water slides—there are scary slides and steep ones and some that go really, really fast. You have to be 48 inches tall to ride any slide or to go into the wave pool without a life jacket.

I went on every slide because I was big enough. I spent hours at Sunsplash riding slides and having so much fun there!

There was an ice cream shop and boys could go in without a shirt or shoes on. I got a huge ice cream there. The wave pool made huge waves that are deep.

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Pennies by Roman Oleinik (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Do you know someone who has had a blood cancer? Chances are, if you do, they may have been helped by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. One person is diagnosed every three minutes with blood cancer. Another 171,550 are expected to be diagnosed in 2016 according to the Leukemia-Lymphoma Society.

Christina Szilvassy, campaign assistant for Pennies for Patients, says the society began in 1949. Its mission is to find a cure for blood cancer. It supports families and patients fighting cancer by assisting them with co-pays and travel programs.

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Childsplay

Childsplay began 40 years ago. David Saar, graduate student at ASU, wanted to bring a group of actors together to put imagination and wonder in the minds and hearts of children. The mission of Childsplay is “to create theater so strikingly original in form, content or both that it instills in young people an enduring awe, love and respect for the medium, thus preserving imagination and wonder, those hallmarks of childhood that are the keys to the future.”

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Campbell Finley at the International Spy Museum with a Spy Lipstick

I went to the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC. I interviewed Lucy Stirn, the Museum Educator who teaches all of Spy Museum’s student workshops and assists with the development of curriculum and education resources. She says, “the museum started in July 2002 by man named Milton Maltz. His idea was to create a place where people can learn about intelligence or spying. There had never been a museum open to the public about spying.” She says, “there is another big spy museum in America, but it’s closed to the public.

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