Courtesy of Scijinks.jpl.nasa.gov/

Well, folks, do you know what time is nearly here? Of course you do—it’s time for the science fair! First, your own school will organize a science fair and then if your project is judged among the best, your project is sent to Southern Arizona Regional Science and Engineering Foundation (SARSEF) Science Fair. You’ll know if you got into the science fair by late February and early March. 

I went to the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. It took 20 minutes by train to get there from London. The Royal Observatory is the location of the prime meridian. The prime meridian separates the eastern and western hemispheres of the earth. It is 0 degrees longitude. At the museum, there was a long gold line that separates the world in half and that’s the prime meridian. You can stand on the west side and east side of the world at the same time. It is an awesome feeling!!! 



Can you imagine thousands and thousands of clay warriors? Well, I went to the Field Museum in Chicago, and guess what? The clay warriors are real! They were built for one person: China’s first Emperor.

Here is a bit of information on the terra cotta warriors. The exhibit is traveling around the country. I hope you get to see it! In 1974, a Chinese farmer found one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. What was it? A life-sized terra cotta warrior! They are made out of fired clay.

Campbell Finley at the International Spy Museum with a Spy Lipstick

I went to the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC. I interviewed Lucy Stirn, the Museum Educator who teaches all of Spy Museum’s student workshops and assists with the development of curriculum and education resources. She says, “the museum started in July 2002 by man named Milton Maltz. His idea was to create a place where people can learn about intelligence or spying. There had never been a museum open to the public about spying.” She says, “there is another big spy museum in America, but it’s closed to the public.